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COUPLES AND COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN

COUPLES AND COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN

Communication breakdown is one of the major issues couples say is the problem in their relationship. The love underneath is felt but a distance has been created where there seems little to say to each other and a sense of boredom has crept in. There are many causes of this that can be addressed with curiosity for “what else”.

Being Present

It is impossible to have good communication if either person is not fully present in the relationship. Having secrets is a major barrier to being present.

Mobile Phones & Laptops

We love them. We need them, as they are storage for things that are important in our lives – our second brain. When going out for dinner or just out, especially with him or her, try leaving them at home. At home when they come home close the computer for a while to chat about each other’s days. We know we are addicted to them because without them we feel, well, naked. When you feel that emotion, being without your phone/computer, know that it is your addiction speaking to you. Interesting!

Immersion

There is a lot or research on the negative aspects of immersion in relationships. That is doing everything together all the time. I know it feels safe to be with him or her but in doing so there is deep down compromise going on, with each person not having any new experiences. And without new experiences there is little to talk about. We don’t really have to do everything together. A separate holiday, a night our with separate friends, yoga class, tennis, book club, a movie – are things that can be done separate to your partner and the benefits are many. There is no need to feel threatened if you have trust in your relationship. You will enjoy it after the first felt emotions.

How is Our Relationship Going Chat

Asking and inviting the answer to the question, “How is our relationship going do you think?” is an excellent thing to do regularly. There are many assumptions made by us individually about our partner’s wellbeing. Inviting the answer to this question allows many things assumed to be discussed. We all want to hear, ‘Great’ but maybe there is a time to talk about sex, finance, domestic duty sharing, time spent with each other, etc.

Love Language

It is very easy to take each other for granted. They always come home, our domestic life is cozy and life is good, safe and predictable. Over time we tend to stop thanking our partners for that cup of tea, forget to organize a restaurant booking, buy theatre tickets, flowers, a card to say ‘I love you’ (or say it), text during the day, call each other by a loving nickname and generally thank them for being there with you.

Being Grateful

I’m sure you have heard about the benefits of sharing what you are grateful for before going to sleep. There you are in fresh sheets, feeling like giggling because you are so happy and cozy next to them and this is the perfect time to reel off 3 things you are grateful for in your life. Doing this is so bonding and it is so simple.

Having a sense of shared curiosity about doing things differently will open up communication between couples. Starting with, “How is our relationship going do you think?” is a great beginning.

 

SURVING AN AFFAIR

AN AFFAIR TO FORGET

You have met the one you love and the first years have been bliss. You have felt validated by being loved and you have extended your love to your partner. Then one day the world changes and you find out they had sex with someone else. You now feel crushed under the fallen debris of deceit and betrayal. How do your survive this shattering discovery and can you still maintain the relationship?

SURVIVING FIRST THOUGHTS

The first reaction is from your mind and it is telling you to walk away, sell any joint property, be on your own and lick your wounds. If you search deeper however your heart might say you still love them and want to talk more about what happened. There is also the physical side of your relationship that has a voice. Your mutual friends, family ties, the dog, the house and a sense of companionship that is still there. Are you really prepared to throw it all away as an act of revenge?

DISCUSS

Maybe it is time to discuss what happened taking a helicopter view rather than a purely emotional one. Maybe you haven’t been communicating lately, maybe you haven’t had sex for ages and no one has been brave enough to talk about it (the brain gets very lazy and de sexes our partners over time) and maybe there are unshared secrets that stopped honest intimacy.

 

There are many choices when infidelity occurs. It can be seen as unforgiveble or as acceptance this was a wake up call. When was the last time the question of, “How are we going do you think?” is asked of the partner. Such a question allows the other to open up emotionally and really talk. Having an honest and open discussion can re-unite a couple by sharing deeper thoughts and vulnerabilities. In doing so secrets that keep couples apart can be revealed and a greater sense of closeness achieved.

MORE TIME TOGETHER?

Maybe you need to: review the whole structure of your relationship like changing work demands so you can spend more time together, plan dates with each other, have weekends away with just the two of you (and the dog), talk about ways to get back in the boat, or the bath, and have sex together (once you get it started the rest will follow) and make time for dreams to aim for (a vegetable patch, travel, spar bath, a dog, new house, etc).

VALUES

Also over time couples develop a different idea of assumed values and attitudes. It is a good idea to see if you and your partner have similar values and attitudes. Are you on the same page today? False assumptions are easily made in long-term interactions. I have developed a values and attitudes survey for couple and if you email me I will send you it to you for free.

HELP

Discovering an infidelity can be heart breaking but there are things a couple can do to move on in the relationship by honest discussion and taking a helicopter view of why it happened. And then plan a future where greater intimacy and closeness can be worked on. Please do try to repair your relationship, as it is harder than you think to find another. Maybe you will both grow through this affair. Take care.

 

Gerry North is a couple and general counsellor treating depression, anxiety, self-esteem building, and addictions.

Email: gerrynorthcounsellor@gmail.com or www.counsellingworkslondon.uk

How to Resolve Couple Conflicts

The influence of individual internal conflicts is often forgotten in couple counselling. George has been in a relationship with Helen for 15 years. They have great domestic creature comforts, good friends, holiday a bit and like the company of others but deep down there is something amiss.

Well maybe the main problem is not about them as a couple but more about their own unhealed personal internal conflicts. Helen was lied to in a previous relationship and lacks trust. George deep down feels he is not as capable as others either at work, socially or at making decisions.

George also had an alcoholic father who verbally, and at times, physically abused him. Helen had an over protective mother who was obsessed with the body functions of her children and their cleanliness. These secret and unresolved internal conflicts are at play in their daily couple relationship, without them being fully conscious of it.

We all have different childhood experiences that have made us the way we are as adults. It stands to reason if these personal internal conflicts are not healed, or put to bed, then having them in the background will affect all relationships at a base level – at home, at work and at play.

If you are in a relationship and you consider you have unhealed internal conflicts then maybe it is time to address these first in individual counselling, before seeking couple therapy. You will feel empowered if you can clean your own slate first before negotiating changes in your relationship. In the end the only person we can change is ourselves.

I often find in couple counselling one partner wanting me to take their side to tell the other they are wrong. Couple counselling is not about finding blame but more about negotiating new pathways. To do that partners need to reflect on the value of their own decisions – are they really the right ones all the time?

Personal therapy, to dilute the demons of our mind, can change our behaviour in all aspects in life. It can make us happier at work, socially, with our families and in our lives with our closest life partner.